Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Best use of Psychological Service treatment resources

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

The Psychological Service would contribute most to the Department of Corrections’ aim of reducing re-offending by concentrating treatment resources on offenders likely to be re-convicted. This report considers various traditional ways of deciding how treatment resources should be used, including the methods of authority, population numbers and demand, which are no longer useful, as well as allocation according to special needs, which is still used in some overseas jurisdictions.

A review of what is known about prevalence of reconviction suggests that between a quarter and a third of offenders are frequently reconvicted, and for serious offences. Since these offenders are committing a high proportion of all crime, changing their behaviour is likely to impact significantly on overall reoffending.

Criminogenic Needs Inventory (CNI)

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

The Criminogenic Needs Inventory (CNI) has been developed to complement the Risk of reconviction (RoC) models by identifying why offenders are at risk. Specifically, it addresses the shortcomings of existing needs risk instruments such as the Level of Service Inventory.

Census of Prison Inmates and Home Detainees

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

The census provides a snapshot of the inmate population, which assists the Department in the analysis of how best to respond to offenders' needs and reduce re-offending.

A census of prison inmates has been carried out biennially in November since 1987. The Department of Justice administered the census until 1993, and the Ministry of Justice until 1997. The Department of Corrections took over this responsibility in 1999. The current census provides statistical data on inmates within the prison system as at 20 November 2003.

Child Sex Offender Treatment

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Auckland University of Technology

A recent study of New Zealand community-based programmes for men who sexually offend against children has shown that these programmes are performing well. 

The programmes are run by Auckland-based SAFE Network Inc, STOP Wellington Inc and STOP Trust Christchurch.  The research, carried out by Dr Ian Lambie and Dr Malcolm Stewart of Auckland University, was commissioned by the Department as part of its research and evaluation programme.

Te Whakakotahitanga - An Evaluation of the Te Piriti Special Treatment Programme

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

This study evaluated, in an exploratory fashion, the cultural processes incorporated into the Te Piriti Special Treatment Unit for offenders imprisoned for sexual offences against children. The Te Piriti programme has been in operation for over eight years employing the core cognitive behavioural/social learning theory components utilised in its sister programme Kia Märama in the South Island, as well as processes that are culturally appropriate for Maori. The programme endeavours to implement tikanga Maori within the wider unit and prison environment. However, it needs to be acknowledged that there has been little integration of tikanga Maori processes into the therapy room.

A critical component of this study was the incorporation of the Framework for Reducing Maori Offending (FReMO) concept into the research process. This was necessary to appropriately and effectively evaluate the cultural processes that define the treatment approach provided at Te Piriti. While evaluative aspects such as recidivism and offence related difficulties were examined, the principle focus was on what was different for Maori men convicted of sexual offences against children and whether they benefited from the tikanga focus in the unit.

For many, the concepts within FReMO seem vague and there appears to be little evidence of benefit in the application of FReMO. In our view this project demonstrates that, when applied in a practical fashion, the FReMO process adds value. FReMO is “worth the journey”.

The Effectiveness of Correctional Treatment

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

This aim of this paper is to review the recent history and examine the present state of New Zealand correctional interventions. The focus is specifically on those interventions, programmes, or treatments, which have the goal of reducing re-offending. Beginning in the ‘nothing works’ era of the 1970’s, this paper reviews the international development of effective correctional interventions, and summarises the evaluation of these programmes in terms of published meta-analyses. The development, implementation and evaluation of a number of New Zealand treatment programmes are then discussed. Recidivism outcome measures from these New Zealand programmes are consistent with international benchmarks in terms of their ability to reduce re-offending. There is also a growing body of evidence that the effectiveness of these programmes can be further enhanced through particular attention to established principles of programme best practice, including providing culturally relevant and appropriate interventions to Maori offenders. A number of suggestions for further increasing the effectiveness of correctional programming are made.

New Zealand high-risk offenders

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

This exploratory study into who high risk offenders actually are, was an attempt to gain more information about offenders who are predicted to be at high risk of serious reoffending. While efforts to address criminogenic factors typically follow the risk/needs/responsivity principles established by Canadian researchers, little information outside of criminal history information and broad demographic details exists on what appears to be a diverse group of offenders. The very offender’s that are the primary management and treatment targets for the Corrections department, in reducing reoffending.

The Utility of the Psychopathy Checklist - Screening Version for Predicting Serious Violent Recidivism in a New Zealand Offender Sample

Year: 2007

Agency: Corrections

Author: University of Waikato

Psychopathy has been identified in a large number of overseas studies as a significant risk factor for general reoffending and in particular for violent reoffending. This study set out to evaluate the ability of the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version to predict criminal reoffending by New Zealand offenders and found a high level of predictive accuracy in predicting serious reoffending. Evidence was also found of a strong relation between psychopathy and speed of violent reoffending.

Reducing Residential Burglary: What can Police do?

Year: 2006

Agency: Ministry of Justice and New Zealand Police

Author: Ministry of Justice and New Zealand Police

The Ministry of Justice, in partnership with the New Zealand Police, has conducted research from 2002 to 2004 on the effectiveness of Police practice in reducing residential burglary. This report contains ideas for good practice that have been drawn from case studies carried out in four Police areas and from a review of the international literature. They outline practices that have worked in specific contexts and times, and are intended as a source of good ideas rather than a prescriptive list.

Public Perceptions of the New Zealand Court System and Processes

Year: 2006

Agency: AC Nielsen

Author: AC Nielsen

This research investigates the perceptions New Zealanders hold of our court system and processes, and compares any changes since the previous measures in March 1999, February 2000, February 2001, February 2002, March 2003, March 2004, and March 2005.