Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Research on the Effectiveness of Police Practice in Reducing Residential Burglary. Report 5: Case Study of the Rotorua Police Area

Year: 2005

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Tanya Segessenmann and Karen Johns

The Ministry of Justice, in partnership with the New Zealand Police, conducted research over three years (2002

Research on the Effectiveness of Police Practice in Reducing Residential Burglary. Report 3: Literature Review: Police Practice in Reducing Residential Burglary

Year: 2005

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Sally Harvey

This literature review summarises the findings of international studies of what works in police practice to reduce residential burglary, drawing largely on the outcomes of research in the UK, the US and Australia. Residential burglary is one of the most common crimes, of great concern to the general public as reflected in crime victim surveys, and regarded as a major problem by police forces studied in the literature. Internationally there has been an increasing adoption of proactive policing with considerable research effort aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of crime prevention approaches. As part of this evaluative effort, the question 'what works?' has been applied to initiatives to reduce residential burglary. International research has established: the increased frequency of burglary in particular locations ('hot' spots); the increased risk of burglary for certain types of households (for example, those in rented accommodation, low-income households, or those who have recently been burgled-'hot' victims); the targeting of particular types of items ('hot' property); the high rates of property offending by a small group of prolific burglars ('hot' offenders). These findings provide the basis for targeted burglary reduction strategies in an approach known as situational crime prevention. This involves analysing crime problems with a view to reducing opportunities for offending through location-focused, victim-focused, property-focused or offender-focused interventions. The literature contains strong evidence of the effectiveness of burglary reduction strategies targeting 'hot' locations, 'hot' victims, and 'hot' offenders and supports initiatives targeting 'hot' property.

New Zealand Court-Referred Restorative Justice Pilot: Two year follow-up of reoffending

Year: 2005

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Sue Triggs

The main focus of this report is reoffending by offenders who attended a court-referred restiorative justice conference (the conferenced group). Reoffending, as measured by the reconviction rate, was assessed throughout the two year follow-up period (using survival analysis) and at the end of the one year and two year follow-up periods. The seriousness of reoffending and the subsequent imprisonment rate were also examined. The results for the conferenced group were compared with their predicted reconviction rates, which were derived from a logistic regression model. The results for the conferenced group were also compared with the results for ten matched comparison groups, selected from eligible offenders who were not referred to the pilot.

Research on the Effectiveness of Police Practice in Reducing Residential Burglary. Report 7: Case Study of the Sydenham Police Area

Year: 2005

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Sue Carswell and Karen Johns

The Ministry of Justice, in partnership with the New Zealand Police, has conducted research over three years (2002

The Impact of Enforcement on Intoxication and Alcohol Related Harm

Year: 2005

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Geneye Research Ltd

The enforcement of liquor licensing laws by police and regulatory officials is intended to keep drinking environments safe, contribute to the reduction of liquor abuse, prevent excessive consumption of alcohol, and prevent the sale of alcohol to minors.

In Wellington, the enforcement of licensing laws involves regular visits to licensed premises by police and regulatory officials. The present study sought to test the effectiveness of these visits to licensed premises, by using an interrupted time series quasi-experimental approach.

Police formed a specialist Liquor Policing Unit (LPU) of six staff to achieve the heightened levels of enforcement. The impact of these interventions was compared to the impact of “normal” enforcement activity during the month preceding the first intervention, the intervening two months between interventions and during the month following the second intervention.

Perceptions of Public Safety in the Auckland CBD

Year: 2005

Agency: NZ Police

Author: AUT University

Earlier this year, the Institute of Public Policy at AUT University carried out a customer satisfaction survey for the Auckland City District Police. One of the aims of the survey was to examine perceptions of public safety in the Auckland city's central business district (CBD). In particular the survey investigated (1) public use of the CBD; (2) peoples perceptions of public safety within the CBD; and (3) whether peoples views on safety within that area had changed over the last five years.

In this article, Casey and Crothers firstly review the research which has been undertaken on behalf of Auckland City and which has addressed the issue of public safety in the CBD. They also examine the strategies council has developed which may have a bearing on the issue of CBD safety.

The authors then discuss the findings of the Auckland City District Police customer satisfaction survey 2005 which canvassed the usage and perceptions of safety in the Auckland CBD among three discrete population samples:- 820 random householders; 209 senior college students and 117 international tertiary students.

Finally, the authors discuss the implications of the survey results for the various joint police/council initiatives to improve CBD safety and make a number of suggestions for actions which might impact positively on future perceptions of safety in the Auckland CBD.

Investigative Interviewing - The Literature

Year: 2005

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

This review provides an overview of investigative interviewing within policing. It may also be of interest to anyone who uses this type of interviewing on the job including insurance fraud investigators, lawyers, and government departments.

The review outlines the efforts made by police and psychologists in recent decades to: convey the importance of investigative interviewing; understand what happens in an investigative Interview; use psychological theories and research to find out what makes a successful interview; examine the effectiveness of various skills and Techniques; find a basic framework and rationale to underlie investigative interviews; and to produce guidelines on how to conduct interviews.

Communications Centres Service Centre Independent External Review - Final Report

Year: 2005

Agency: NZ Police

Author: New South Wales PoliceToronto Police ServiceNorth Wales PolicePricewaterhouse Coopers Ltd

The operational effectiveness and efficiency of the New Zealand Police Communications Centres Service Centre (CCSC) have been questioned following a number of high profile incidents. As a result of incidents in late 2004, the Commissioner of Police decided to assemble an independent, external Review Panel.

The Panel was composed of senior police communications experts from Australia, Wales and Canada, and an organisational psychologist from New Zealand. The Panel was directed to make recommendations to ensure the CCSC continues to meet public, staff and Police expectations for public and staff safety, public confidence, and policing effectiveness.

Young People and Alcohol: Some Statistics to 2002 on Possible Effects of Lowering the Drinking Age

Year: 2004

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Barb Lash

This report (the third in a series) presents some statistics on the possible effects of the Sale of Liquor Amendment Act 1999, and focuses on the lowering of the drinking age.

The Sentencing Act 2002: Monitoring the First Year

Year: 2004

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Rajesh Chhana, Philip Spier, Susan Roberts, Chris Hurd

This report considers the impact that the Sentencing Act 2002 ("the Act") had on sentencing practice during the 12 months following it coming into force, in terms of the key changes that were made to sentencing policy. The report draws on an extensive review of judgments delivered by the courts at all levels and an analysis of statistics on a before and after basis.