Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Reconviction And Reimprisonment Rates For Released Prisoners

Year: 2002

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Philip Spier

This paper presents information on the prior and post conviction histories of the 22,340 inmates released from prison between 1995 and 1998.

Evaluation of Programmes for Maori Adult Protected Persons Under the Domestic Violence Act 1995

Year: 2002

Agency: International Research Institute for Maori and Indigenous Education University of Auckland

Author: Fiona Cram, Leonie Pihame, Kuni Jenkins, Matewiki Karehana

This is the final report in a series of evaluations commissioned by the Ministry of Justice and Department for Courts to examine the impact of the Domestic Violence Act 1995. These evaluations, together and separately, serve to inform us of the effectiveness of the Act. Overall, the evaluations report that the programmes are important and provide benefits for protected persons, children and respondents and that there is support for the legislative framework. This report not only examines the legislative environment for delivering programmes to Maori women, it also looks more broadly at defining Maori domestic violence, and the impacts of colonisation and violence on indigenous communities. Two programmes delivered by Maori providers for Maori Adult Protected Persons are evaluated in this report. Both used Kaupapa Maori as a basis to explore a political, social and cultural analysis of domestic violence within the context of their programmes. Both programmes involved in the evaluation continued to grow and develop in line with their visions of how best to serve their communities and confront issues of domestic violence.

Young People And Alcohol: Some Statistics On Possible Effects Of Lowering The Drinking Age

Year: 2002

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Barb Lash

This report presents some statistics on the possible effects of the Sale of Liquor Amendment Act 1999, and focuses on the lowering of the drinking age. The statistics presented are mostly limited to those statistics routinely collected on a national basis for various purposes. The statistics presented do not explicitly measure the impact of lowering the minimum legal drinking age, rather, they are indicators of the possible impact of lowering the drinking age. Changes in indicator levels over time may be due to other factors, such as changes in Police practices or recording practices. At best, statistical information was available for two years following the law change. For these reasons, these statistics represent only a partial picture of the likely impact of lowering the drinking age. The first version of this report was published in 2002 (Lash 2002). This report updates the earlier report with new information and the inclusion of another year of data.

Guardianship, Custody and Access: Maori Perspectives and Experiences

Year: 2002

Agency: Strategic Training and Development Services

Author: Di Pitama, George Ririnui, and Ani Mikaere

This research contributes to the review of the Guardianship Act 1968. The objective of the research was to provide information on the experiences of Maori whanau and individuals when they engage with the Family Courts over matters of guardianship, custody and access. The research involved a small number of kanohi ki te kanohi (face-to-face) interviews with whanau who have been involved in guardianship proceedings. It also included interviews with legal counsel and social service providers involved in the Family Courts. From these interviews valuable insights are gained about the impact of the guardianship, custody and access arrangements on Maori whanau. The literature review provides a broader context for the individual perspectives recorded in the research by identifying key principles underlying Maori child raising. The report identifies key principles that could be further explored for better recognising Maori perspectives on guardianship, custody and access, and facilitating more effective Maori participation in Family Court proceedings. This research provides useful input into the development of policy to better meet the needs of Maori involved in guardianship proceedings and, more broadly, Maori users of the Family Courts.

Seven New Police Youth Development Programmes 2002

Year: 2002

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

This report is a product of both the formative and process evaluation phases of the seven Youth Development Programmes. Following the perceived success of 14 original Police Youth at Risk programmes, the 2000/01 Police budget included funding for the establishment of five new Youth Development Programmes. In addition, the Police and the Crime Prevention Unit (CPU) jointly funded a further two programmes.

Firstly, a brief methodology describes the processes by which the information in this report was collected. The body of the report comprises of a programme description for each of the seven programmes describing the development of the programme and the consultation that took place in the formative phase, as well as describing programme operation for the first year of the process evaluation. 

As indicated within each description, the information within the report is based on that provided by programme staff and in some cases, initial proposal documentation. These descriptions will form the basis for the aforementioned process evaluation analysis documents.

Outcome Evaluation of Police Youth at Risk Programmes - July 1997 to June 2000

Year: 2002

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

The Government’s 1994 crime prevention strategy identified seven goals, one of which specified the establishment of preventative programmes targeted at “youth at risk” of offending. As a result, the 1997 Crime Prevention Youth at Risk (CPYAR) package, dedicated to the three fiscal years beginning July 1997, invested $8.7 million in Youth at Risk strategies, with funding allocated to 14 programmes throughout New Zealand.

This outcome evaluation of the 14 Police Youth at Risk programmes is based on data from the period July 1997 to June 2000, and aims to assess the extent to which each programme met the Police objectives, and overall effectiveness of each programme.

Recidivism Patterns for People Convicted in 1995

Year: 2001

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Philip Spier

This research summarises some of the information available on the prior and post offending histories of the 104,920 people with a convicted case in 1995. Information is provided for all offenders convicted in 1995, then for violent offenders and burglars, as there is particular interest in these two groups of offenders. A database has been established with the offending histories of all people convicted in 1995. Both criminal (non-traffic) and traffic conviction histories were extracted from the Law Enforcement System. A complete history of each person

Women Living Without Violence: An evaluation of programmes for adult protected persons under the Domestic Violence Act 1995

Year: 2001

Agency: Institute of Criminology Victoria University

Author: Gabrielle Maxwell, Tracy Anderson and Teresea Olsen

This is a process and outcome evaluation of two programmes for adult protected persons provided under the Domestic Violence Act 1995. The principal aim of the evaluation was to establish:

Survey On Public Attitudes Towards The Physical Discipline Of Children

Year: 2001

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Sue Carswell

The survey was conducted by the Ministry of Justice to ascertain public attitudes towards the physical discipline of children. This information is to inform ongoing policy work on section 59 of the Crimes Act 1961. Section 59 provides a defence to parents charged with assault against their children. Under section 59, every parent of a child (and every person in the place of the parent of a child) is justified in using force by way of correction towards the child, if the force used is reasonable in the circumstances.

The Age of Physical Abuse Victims And The Sentence Imposed On Their Abusers

Year: 2001

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Christopher Clark

There is disquiet among some members of the public who perceive that offenders who abuse children are given lighter sentences than offenders who abuse adults. Their concerns were brought to the fore in October 2000 when a woman was sentenced to four months imprisonment for dousing her ten-year-old foster son in petrol and accidentally setting him alight. Ministry of Justice researchers undertook a small project to compare the sentences imposed on offenders charged with physical assault with reference to the age of their victims. The research is based on data extracted from the Law Enforcement System (LES) and from court files for charges involving physical (non-sexual) assaults that were finalised in 1999.