Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

NZCASS in an International Context: Comparing the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey with other international surveys

Year: 2010

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Bronwyn Morrison, Melissa Smith and Lisa Gregg

The proliferation of national-level and international victimisation survey results, together with the growing tendency to export and import criminal justice policies on a global scale, has made the international comparison of crime and victimisation levels both expected and inevitable. It is therefore appropriate to reflect on how the results from the 2009 New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) compare with those from other countries. The purpose of this paper is two-fold: first, to highlight some common high-level findings across the different surveys and reflect on the implications of these findings for crime prevention in New Zealand; second, to broadly compare the method and design of the NZCASS with other international surveys, highlighting key differences and the impact these have for comparing precise results across different countries.

Evaluation of the Implementation of Investigative Interviewing Training and Assessment (Level 1)

Year: 2010

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

The 2008 NZ Police Investigative Interviewing strategy aims to improve investigative interviewing, the quality of investigations and professionalism of staff. Staff are trained in the PEACE interviewing framework and a competency framework for the accreditation of staff has been implemented.

This report presents findings of a process evaluation of implementation of Level 1 investigative interviewing. The evaluation focused on how the training and accreditation processes are being implemented, monitoring and supervision of interviews and improvements that could be made to these processes. The extent of the use of the framework, access to resources and perceptions of progress towards intended outcomes of the Investigative Interviewing strategy use of PEACE were also examined.

The evaluation findings are based on analysis of data collected from a number of sources, including in-depth interviews, focus groups, surveys, human resources data and background documentation.

Evaluation of the Mental Health/Alcohol and Other Drug Watch-house Nurse Pilot Initiative

Year: 2010

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

The Watch-house Nurse (WHN) initiative began operating at the Christchurch Central and Counties Manukau Police station watch-houses on 1 July 2008 and 1 August 2008 respectively. The initiative is intended to run as a pilot project until 30 June 2010. The initiative places appropriately qualified nurses within these two watch-houses to assist the Police to better manage the risks of those in their custody who have mental health, alcohol or other drug (AOD) problems. Where appropriate, the nurses also make referrals for detainees to treatment providers.

This final evaluation report presents the findings about the WHN initiative during its first 18 months of operation. In doing so, it addresses the main objectives of the pilot, and intended outcomes of these objectives in turn.

Building Diversity: Understanding the Factors that Influence Maori to join the Police

Year: 2010

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Research Evaluation Consultancy Limited

A long established principle is that the police service ought to mirror the ethnic profile of the wider population in order to secure and maintain public confidence and police legitimacy. A key goal for New Zealand Police (NZP) is to achieve equity and diversity in their workforce. This research focuses on exploring factors that influence Maori to apply to and join Police.

The objectives of the research were to explore factors that influence Maori to apply and join NZ Police; explore the role of Police Maori recruitment initiatives, including Te Haerenga, in attracting Maori to join NZ Police; and to identify improvements to Police initiatives and processes for recruiting Maori.

 

Alcohol and other drug use in New Zealand drivers 2004 to 2009

Year: 2010

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Environmental Science and Research Ltd (ESR)

This study looks at the prevalence of drug use by drivers on New Zealand roads.  The driving populations considered are biased populations and the results that have been obtained can be considered only as indicators of possible drug use in the wider driving population.   

The driving populations considered in this study are:  Sample one:  Drivers killed as a result of a crash over the period of 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2009, and;  Sample two: Drivers not involved in crashes but who had an evidential blood sample taken for alcohol analysis. The blood samples were collected over a six month period.

Understanding Victimisation Risk: New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2006

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: James Reilly and Pat Mayhew

This paper has been superseded by the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) 2014.

Te Hurihanga Pilot: Evaluation Report

Year: 2009

Agency: Centre for Research, Evaluation and Social Assessment (CRESA)

Author: Julie Warren, with Lydia Fraser

This evaluation report provides the Ministry of Justice with findings from a two-year evaluation that began late June 2007 and was completed in July 2009. Te Hurihanga (The Turning Point) is a Ministry of Justice response to the problem of youth offending. It is a nine to eighteen month therapeutic programme for young males (aged 14 to 16 years at entry) who have appeared before the courts and who live within the Hamilton/Waikato region.

Self-Represented Litigants: An Exploratory Study of Litigants in Person in the New Zealand Criminal Summary and Family Jurisdictions

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Melissa Smith, Esther Banbury and Su-Wuen Ong

The objectives were to study self-represented litigants in the family and criminal summary jurisdictions of district courts, in particular answering the following questions:

What are the key characteristics of self-represented litigants?
Why are they self-represented?
What effect does their lack of representation have on them, the other party, the court process, the judiciary, court staff, lawyers and others?
To what extent are information and resources accessed by self-represented litigants?

Exploring Victimisation in Sole-Parent Households: Findings from the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2006

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Pat Mayhew and Ken Huang

This paper has been superseded by the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) 2014.

Identifying and Responding to Bias in the Criminal Justice System: A Review of International and New Zealand Research

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Bronwyn Morrison

The review summarises international and New Zealand research findings on bias against ethnic minority and indigenous peoples at key stages of the criminal justice system. The discretion points examined include: stop and search, arrest, charging, prosecution, conviction, sentencing (including decisions surrounding legal representation, plea, bail, mode of trial, and pre-sentence reports), custodial sentence management decisions within the prison system, and parole.

The review is based on research published during the last 40 years, and concentrates exclusively on literature from Australia, Canada, England and Wales, the United States, and New Zealand. It represents the most comprehensive review of the literature on race/ethnicity and the criminal justice system undertaken in New Zealand to date.

It focuses predominantly on the adult criminal justice system and examines decisions affecting offenders rather than victims. While it was originally intended that the review would focus on Māori and Pacific offenders, the paucity of information published about Pacific offenders meant that the majority of the New Zealand research included is based solely on Māori offenders.

The review found that while an extensive amount of international literature has investigated bias in the criminal justice system, comparatively little recent work has been published on this issue in New Zealand.

Despite the volume of international studies, straightforward answers about the nature and extent of bias operating against ethnic minority and indigenous people are seldom forthcoming within the literature.

Considerable disagreement exists within the literature about how to define the problem (including both its cause(s) and the language used to describe it), how to best measure it, and what should be done to address it.