Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

New Zealand Police research applications requirements

Year: 2008

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

People wanting to do research involving NZ Police are required to seek approval from the Research and Evaluation Steering Committee. The committee aims to ensure Police-related research or evaluation will have benefits for Police; be of good standard; meet our privacy obligations; and be feasible in relation to demands on Police time and resources. Researchers preparing information for assessment should use the proposal requirements within. The process will take at least one month, depending on the completeness of the information provided.

Barriers to Recruiting a Diverse Workforce: Literature reviews

Year: 2008

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Victoria University of Wellington

This report responds to a request by New Zealand Police to produce two literature reviews on the barriers to the recruitment of (i) women, and (ii) Maori, Pacific and ethnic groups. It has been prepared by the Crime and Justice Research Centre (CJRC) in collaboration with the Institute of Criminology.

The purpose of the literature reviews is to provide a fuller picture from the literature of recruitment issues both in New Zealand and internationally, and initiatives that have been implemented to address and/or mitigate these barriers. The reviews are to help New Zealand Police to identify good or innovative practice that might inform local approaches to recruitment.

In particular, NZ Police are interested in identifying: the most effective strategies to encourage people to join the Police; ways in which NZ Police can encourage growth in diversity without compromising standards; and the barriers to recruitment, and ways to remove them. 

Evaluation of the Rotorua Mental Health Nurse Initiative

Year: 2008

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

Since 2001 Police have had a mental health nurse working at the Rotorua Police Station to provide assessments and liaison between Police and Mental Health Services to facilitate the treatment of mentally ill detainees/arrestees/remanded. The Police Consult/Liaison Nurse is employed by the Lakes District Health Board (DHB) and comes under the umbrella of their Mental Health Service.

In August 2007, the Police, with the support of the Ministry of Health, commissioned an evaluation of the Rotorua model in order to inform the development of this model in two new pilot sites as part of the Effective Interventions Programme which aims to meet the mental health and AOD needs of offenders to improve their health status and reduce their offending.

This report evaluates the Police Consult/Liaison Nurse role and identifies what is working well and areas for improvement. Key learnings were identified to inform the development of a similar model in other Police watchhouses. The evaluation includes comparative analysis with Tauranga Police Station to see what difference the Police Consult/Liaison Nurse role has had on Police operations and what benefits can be attributed to this role for Police, Mental Health Services and detainees/arrestees.

Multi-Agency Liquor Enforcement study

Year: 2008

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Allen & Clarke Policy and Regulatory SpecialistsAxist Consulting New Zealand LimitedCentre for Social Health OutcomesResearch and Evaluation (SHORE) & Te Ropu Wh?riki, Massey University, Auckland

This study, commissioned with funding from the Cross Departmental Research Pool, sought to test the effectiveness of targeted multi-agency enforcement at reducing the harm caused by intoxication and other risky drinking behaviours in licensed premises.

The study used a quasi-experimental interrupted time series research design to assess the impact of heightened enforcement activity in licensed premises by regulatory and enforcement agencies.  The impact of heightened enforcement was compared to normal levels of enforcement activity.

The research was undertaken in three areas – Manukau East, the northern suburbs of Christchurch and Queenstown – and took place over a period 10 months, between March and December 2006.

EM Bail evaluation

Year: 2008

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Duncan Consulting Services Ltd

This report presents the findings of an evaluation of EM bail (electronic monitoring of defendants on pre-trial bail). The report was prepared by Duncan Consulting Services Ltd under contract to New Zealand Police.

The focus of the evaluation was EM bail processes operated by NZP. Key evaluative questions were: Are these processes operating as intended? Is NZP's supporting infrastructure for EM bail adequate? And how could EM bail processes operate more effectively? 

Reconviction patterns of released prisoners: A 48-months follow-up analysis

Year: 2008

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

This report summarises patterns of reconviction and re-imprisonment amongst almost 5000 offenders who were released from prison during the 12 months period 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2003. The same cohort of offenders was the subject of a previous report in this series, which provided reconviction and re-imprisonment rates within a 36-months follow-up period 1. The current report provides similar data but now with a 48 months follow-up period: that is, figures represent any reconviction for an offence that occurred within 48 months of each individual offender’s release date (up to 31 March 2007) 2. The next report in the series (expected early in 2009) will give figures for a five-year follow-up.

Reconviction Patterns of offenders managed in the community: A 60-months follow-up analysis

Year: 2008

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

This report is the second in a series of reports which summarise patterns of reconviction (over 5 years) amongst almost 35000 offenders who started community sentences in 2002/03.

Offender characteristics such as gender, ethnicity, age at start of sentence, age at first conviction, offence type and offenders’ previous criminal history are each examined with reference to reconviction and imprisonment.

The study also pays particular attention to reconviction outcomes for offenders on Home Detention orders.

Maori Offenders and Home Detention: Analysis of a One-Year Cohort

Year: 2008

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

A clear disparity has been identified between Maori and New Zealand European offenders with respect to both “leave to apply” for Home Detention, and approval of applications to the Parole Board.. A statistically-based analysis was undertaken to investigate possible reasons for this disparity. This indicated that Maori offenders potentially eligible for Home Detention tended to present with more extensive offending histories, including failure to comply with previous sentences and orders. Such characteristics largely (though not entirely) explained the lower rates with which Maori obtained access to Home Detention.

Over-representation of Maori in the criminal justice system

Year: 2008

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

This report examines the over-representation of Maori in various points of the criminal justice system in order to answer the question of why the numbers of Maori are so high.

Reconviction patterns of released prisoners: A 60-months follow-up analysis

Year: 2008

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

 

 

The report highlights important differences in the re-offending risk of different sub-types of offenders. The relatively high rates of re-imprisonment for Maori and for young offenders are particularly concerning.

 

The report points to potentially fruitful areas of research to better understand why the identified trends occur, and what might be done to address risk factors which affect certain sub-groups.