Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Justice Sector Seriousness Score (2016 update): FAQs

Year: 2017

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Charles Sullivan, Ong Su-Wuen, Rory McRae

Details: https://www.justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/2016-FAQs-Seriousness-Scores2.pdf

Seriousness scores are a way of quantifying the relative seriousness of offences based on the sentences imposed for each offence. Users need to be aware that sentences are an imperfect proxy for seriousness because they take into account factors other than seriousness of the offence under consideration (eg, previous criminal history of the offender).
Uses for seriousness scores across the justice sector include:

-Helping to determine the ‘most serious offence’ for an offender or case
-Department of Corrections risk of reimprisonment tool RoC*RoI
-Monitoring effectiveness of interventions (eg, to check whether seriousness of youth re-offending reduces after interventions).

Investment brief: Restorative Justice

Year: 2016

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

Investment briefs summarise the evidence about how well the investment reduces crime, how much is spent on it, and whether there is scope to increase the level of investment. This brief shows that: there is strong evidence that restorative justice (RJ) is effective at reducing crime; the international evidence shows that RJ also provides benefits for some victims.

Investment brief: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Year: 2016

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

Investment briefs summarise the evidence about how well the investment reduces crime, how much is spent on it, and whether there is scope to increase the level of investment. This brief shows that: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is the cornerstone of modern approaches to rehabilitate offenders; there is strong evidence that CBT is effective in reducing crime; in a different context, there is also strong evidence that CBT is effective at treating a wide range of mental health conditions.

Investment brief: Correctional Alcohol and Drug Treatment

Year: 2016

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

Investment briefs summarise the evidence about how well the investment reduces crime, how much is spent on it, and whether there is scope to increase the level of investment. This brief shows that: there is strong evidence that Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) treatment is effective in reducing crime; AOD treatment is most effective for offenders at high risk of reoffending; both psychological treatment and treatment using pharmaceuticals can be effective.

Family justice system: Evaluation of Family Dispute Resolution service and mandatory self-representation

Year: 2016

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

In March 2014 changes were made to how the family justice system (FJS) works. This report presents findings from an evaluation of the Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) service and mandatory self-representation one year after their implementation and includes information on improvements suggested by evaluation participants.

Police policy for external researchers' access to resources, data or privileged information

Year: 2016

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

The Policy for providing access to Police’s data, resources or privileged information, includes relevant legislation and protocols, the principles governing this access, and the requirement for external researchers to enter into a Police Research Agreement.

Comorbid substance use disorders and mental health disorders among New Zealand prisoners

Year: 2016

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and co-occurrence of mental health and substance use disorders among New Zealand prisoners.

Women's Experiences of Re-offending and Rehabilitation

Year: 2016

Agency: Corrections

This research focusses on the narratives of a group of women in new Zealand who had served sentences managed by the Department of Corrections, had received some form of rehabilitation, but nevertheless had re-offended. It sought to understand what women thought were important factors driving their re-offending, and how approaches to rehabilitative assistance could be improved to support desistance from crime.

Public Perceptions of Crime and the Criminal Justice System Survey 2016

Year: 2016

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Colmar Brunton

Details: https://justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/20161130-Final-PPS-report.pdf

This online survey took place in June-July 2016. 79% of respondents had interacted with the criminal justice system in the past two years. 405 of these said their overall experience was 'very positive' or 'quite positive'.

The survey includes public perceptions of local and national crime, causes of crime, and the criminal justice system.

Final Process Evaluation for the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Court Te Whare Whakapiki Wairua

Year: 2016

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Litmus Limited

The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Court (AODT Court) is a specialist court that is intended to: reduce reoffending, AOD consumption and dependency, the use of imprisonment; positively impact on health and wellbeing; be cost-effective. The AODT Court began operating in November 2012.

The Ministry of Justice commissioned a formative evaluation, and interim and final process evaluations, to assess and inform the implementation of the AODT Court. This document reports on the findings from the final process evaluation, which assessed the actual operation of the AODT Court and its evolution against the intended design to inform the interpretation of programme outcomes.

New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2014

Year: 2015

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

The New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) is a face-to-face survey of almost 7000 randomly chosen people living in New Zealand who are aged 15 or over. The NZCASS has been carried out three times: 2014, 2009 and 2006.

Policing the First World War: slygrogging, sex and sedition

Year: 2015

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Elizabeth Plumridge, Rowan Carroll, New Zealand Police Museum

In the 1914-18 war, civilian society in New Zealand had to turn itself into a militarised society. The population of New Zealand at the beginning of the Great War was a little over one million, of that number 100,000 were eligible to serve. Persuading those eligible to join up did not happen ‘naturally’: it required coercion on a grand scale. Throughout WWI New Zealand Police were the invisible military machine.
The New Zealand Police Museum have researched and written seven essays that explain the role of New Zealand Police during WWI, Please feel free to read and share but don’t forget to reference the source.

Sex Offenders

Year: 2015

Agency: Corrections

Around 500 offenders are sentenced to imprisonment each year for sex offences, which is only about 7 percent of total receptions. However, their sentences tend to be significantly longer than the average. Consequently, they spend longer periods in prison, and thus comprise a significant proportion of the prison population, a proportion which is slowly but steadily increasing. For this reason, as well as the fact their crimes are very serious, and the risks to public safety of any subsequent re-offending, they are an important focus for rehabilitation as well as post-release management.

Pacific Offenders

Year: 2015

Agency: Corrections

Offenders of Pacific ethnicity make up 12 percent of all prisoners, and a slightly lower proportion of the population of offenders serving community sentences (10%). This report provides a statistical breakdown of trends in the Pacific offender population in recent years, in relation to gender, offence type, age and other key characteristics.

Young Offenders

Year: 2015

Agency: Corrections

While offenders under the age of 20 account for a small proportion of offenders serving sentences administered by Corrections, they are an important target group. Effective intervention with young offenders has the potential to have a substantial impact on re-offending, shortening what might otherwise be lengthy criminal trajectories.

Process Evaluation for the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Court Pilot, Te Whare Whakapiki Wairua: Interim Report

Year: 2015

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Litmus Limited

The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment (AODT) Court is a pilot designed to supervise offenders whose offending is driven by their alcohol or other drug dependency.  The purpose of this evaluation was to describe how the AODTCs are working in practice after the first two years, including how processes have developed since the formative evaluation.

Public Perceptions of Crime and the Criminal Justice System Survey 2014

Year: 2014

Agency: Colmar Brunton

Author: Colmar Brunton

The Ministry of Justice commissioned Colmar Brunton to undertake a survey to investigate public perceptions about crime and the criminal justice system. This is the second iteration of this survey.

Court User Survey 2014: A Summary of Findings

Year: 2014

Agency: Colmar Brunton

Author: Colmar Brunton

The Ministry of Justice commissioned Colmar Brunton to conduct the survey, which is designed to measure user experience of, and satisfaction with, frontline services and facilities provided by the Ministry at court sites. The results are used to monitor and improve service delivery and facilities at courts.

Evaluation of the Defendant Centred Courtroom Pilot

Year: 2014

Author: Michelle Lennan and Sue Carswell

The Defendant Centred Courtroom (DCC) pilot trialed a reconfigured District Court courtroom where defendants who are not in custody sit or stand beside their counsel at the front of the court instead of standing in the dock. It is anticipated that placing the defendant at the centre of the courtroom will make the court process more understandable and accessible for defendants. It is expected that increasing understanding and engagement will culminate in a reduction in reoffending and an increase in sentence compliance among participating defendants.

Evaluation of the 2013/14 Safer Summer Road Safety Campaign

Year: 2014

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

The 10km/h speed enforcement threshold has been reduced to 4km/h during official holiday periods in New Zealand since Queen’s Birthday weekend 2010. The 2013/14 Safer Summer road safety campaign was the first time the speed enforcement threshold reduction had been extended beyond official holiday periods to a full two month period.

The campaign was carried out by Police from 1 December 2013 to 31 January 2014, and supported by the wider road safety sector. It involved a well-publicised reduced speed enforcement threshold, combined with intensified and highly visible speed enforcement.

The final report evaluates the effects of the campaign on speeding and crashes.