Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Domestic Violence Act 1995: Process Evaluation

Year: 2000

Agency: Gray Matter Research Ltd

Author: Helena Barwick, Alison Gray and Roger Macky

Data gathered for the evaluation, included statistics on applications; a study of 335 court files of applications; a national survey of all Family Court Judges, all Family Court Coordinators and a sample of lawyers doing Family Court work; interviews with judges, court staff, lawyers, police, private document servers, programme providers and community groups in four sites; interviews with applicants and respondents under the Act; interviews with those who have been victims of domestic violence but have not applied for a protection order; case studies of best practice in different aspects of the implementation of the Act.

Speaking about Cultural Background at Sentencing: Section 16 of the Criminal Justice Act 1985

Year: 2000

Agency: Ministry of Justice, Strategic Training and Development Services and The Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit

Author: Alison Chetwin, Tony Waldegrave, Kiri Simonsen, Strategic Training and Development Services and The Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit

Section 16 of the Criminal Justice Act 1995 allows an offender’s supporter to present information at sentencing about an offender’s ethnic or cultural background, the way that may relate to the offending, and the way that may help in avoiding future offending.

This research has investigated the purposes of section 16, the use and the effects of using section 16, and possible reasons for a lack of use. The study has also sought to identify any improvements that could be made to the legislation, or to the way the legislation is implemented.

The research draws information from eleven case studies of situations in which section 16 has been used. Six of these case studies involved offenders who were Maori, three involved offenders who were Pacific People, one involved a Japanese offender and one a New Zealand European offender. Further information was gathered from a national postal survey of judges, lawyers, Community Probation Service staff, and community organisations.

Challenging Perspectives - Police and Maori Attitudes Toward One Another

Year: 2000

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Victoria Link Ltd

In 1997 NZ Police and Te Puni Kōkiri commissioned research from Victoria Link on Perceptions of Maori and Police. This research comprised two complimentary but separate components. 

The first, Maori Perceptions of the Police by Pania Te Whaiti and Michel Roguski from He Parekerekere, sought information on Maori attitudes towards the police; and the second, Police Perceptions of Maori by Gabrielle Maxwell and Catherine Smith from the Institute of Criminology, examined police views about their behaviour and attitudes toward Maori. 

This summary document provides an overview of the two research reports. However, the document is not intended to be a substituted for reading the two reports. This document is necessarily brief and selective in the information it presents, and consequently a full understanding of the issues can only be obtained by reference to the research reports themselves.

This document outlines who was involved in the research, how it was done, and the main findings. Section 2 explains the background to the research, and section 3 provides a general introduction to the two studies. This is followed by more detailed discussion of each study in sections 4 and 5. The final section focuses on policy implications of the research.

The Domestic Violence Legislation and Child Access in New Zealand

Year: 1999

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Alison Chetwin, Trish Knaggs and Patricia Te Wairere Ahiahi Young

This research study was designed to assess the implementation and impacts of the new provisions in the Domestic Violence Act 1995 and an amendment to the Guardianship Act 1968 in relation to the arrangements made for access to children. In 1997, a study of 558 files from five Family Courts was completed. The cases selected were applications for Protection Orders in which children were involved and applications for custody in which there were allegations of violence. Fifty three key informants were interviewed, including providers of supervised access services, programme providers, court staff, lawyers, and judges. In 1998, interviews were conducted with 82 custodial and non-custodial parents and five people who had supervised access informally.

Sentencing in New Zealand: A Statistical Analysis

Year: 1999

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Sue Triggs

The aim of this research was to quantify the relative effect of various statistical factors on current and past sentencing practice in New Zealand. A particular objective was to identify factors influencing the use of community-based sentences, including the extent to which community-based sentences are being used as an alternative to imprisonment and the extent of changes in sentencing practice that have accompanied the very significant increase in the use of community-based sentences over the last decade and a half.

From Crime to Sentence: Trends in Criminal Justice, 1986 to 1996

Year: 1998

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Sue Triggs

The aim of this publication is to bring together statistics on enforcement, prosecution, sentencing and correctional populations to give an integrated picture of the criminal justice system. As the development of criminal justice policy requires information not only on the current make-up of the system, but also on how the system functions over time and responds to change, this report examines trends from 1986 to 1996 in the volume and type of the offences and offenders at each stage of the system and in the system as a whole. To achieve this a computerised statistical model of the criminal justice system was developed. The model is also being used to forecast future trends and to estimate the potential impacts of proposed policy changes.

Those on Bail in New Zealand in 1994 and their Offending

Year: 1998

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Barb Lash

This report provides information on the characteristics of people remanded on bail. The extent of offending while on bail and the nature of such offending is analysed. The report also compares cases in four categories: those remanded on bail throughout the case, those remanded on bail for some of the case and remanded in custody for some of the case, those remanded in custody throughout the case, and those not remanded on bail or in custody at any stage of the case. The cases analysed in this report were all those finalised in 1994 where the first and last court appearance were not on the same day.

Maori Perceptions of the Police - 1998

Year: 1998

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Victoria Link Ltd

New Zealand Police, in collaboration with Te Puni Kokiri, sponsored this research project with the aim of providing information to enable organizational change in the Police. This organizational change would contribute towards an improved perception by Maori of the police.

The research begins by explaining the research methodology and the history of police interaction with Maori. This is followed by the results which are then broken down into four key areas; suspects, victims of crime, Maori youth, and complaints against police. The report moves to discuss “What Works Best” concerning participants’ perceptions of current police relationships with iwi and Maori communities and how these relationships may be improved. Finally the report concludes with a summary of findings.

This report forms one of two specific components of the project ‘Perceptions of Maori and Police’. The two components have been researched independently of each other. This volume, ‘Maori Perceptions of the Police’, was researched and written by Pania Te Whaiti and Dr Michael Roguski at the School of Education, Victoria University. The other volume, ‘Police Perceptions of Maori’, was researched and written by the Institute of Criminology, Victoria University.

Police Perceptions of the Maori - 1998

Year: 1998

Agency: NZ Police

Author: Victoria Link Ltd

New Zealand Police, in collaboration with Te Puni Kokiri, sponsored this research project which aims to examine police how police view their behaviour and attitudes toward Maori, to look at factors associated with different attitudes among police officers and to assess likely responses to proposed changes for building responsiveness to Maori planned as part of Policing 2000.

This report forms one of two specific components of the project ‘Perceptions of Maori and Police’. The two components have been researched independently of each other. This volume, ‘Police Perceptions of Maori’, was researched and written by Garbielle Maxwell and Catherine Smith, Institute of Criminology, Victoria University of Wellington. The other volume, ‘Maori Perceptions of Police’, was researched and written by Pania Te Whaiti and Dr Michael Roguski at the School of Education, Victoria University.

A Summary of the Crime Victims and Women's Safety Survey

Year: 1997

Agency: Victimisation Survey Committee

Author: Allison Morris

The National Survey of Crime Victims explored the experience of victimisation of 5000 randomly selected New Zealanders. The Women's Safety Survey aimed more specifically to explore violence against women by their male partners. Thus women who had already participated in the National Survey of Crime Victims and who were currently living with a male partner (referred to in the text as women with current partners), or who had been living with a male partner within the last two years but were not now (referred to in the text as women with recent partners), were invited to participate. The principal objectives of the Women's Safety Survey were: to provide an alternative measure to police statistics of the extent of violence against women by their partners; to provide an alternative measure to the National Survey of Crime Victims of the extent of violence against women by their partners; to describe the context and circumstances of violence against women by their partners; to describe the consequences and effects of violence by women's partners on women and their children; and to identify the people and agencies women who experience violence by their partners talk to or approach for help and describe the women's assessment of that help.