Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Police Safety Orders Formative Evaluation

Year: 2012

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

Police safety orders (PSOs) were introduced by the Domestic Violence Amendment Act 2009 and provided the New Zealand Police with the power to issue and serve PSOs from 1 July 2010. This followed the introduction of similar orders in other jurisdictions, including Australia.

PSOs are a significant development in the law relating to family violence, premised on early intervention and protection for victims of family violence. PSOs enable the Police to provide immediate protection to victims of family violence.

In October 2010, the New Zealand Police commissioned the Crime and Justice Research Centre to carry out a formative evaluation to understand the implementation of PSOs and to inform the policy and practices surrounding their use.

Formative evaluation of Neighbourhood Policing Teams in Counties Manukau District

Year: 2012

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

This report presents a summary of findings from formative evaluation of Neighbourhood Policing Teams (NPTs) in Counties Manukau District. The focus of this formative evaluation has been on the development of the NPT approach in Counties Manukau District and the establishment of the Mangere South, Papakura East, Homai and Takanini NPTs.

It is intended that these findings be used to refine the role and function of the NPTs in Counties Manukau District and inform the design requirements and implementation of teams in other districts.

Prisoner double-bunking: Perceptions and impacts (2012)

Year: 2012

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

Throughout the last decade the Department of Corrections was faced with the need to accommodate significant increases in the number of prisoners, and to do so cost-effectively.  Amongst a number of strategies in response, extending the level of double bunking was pursued over a period spanning 2009-2011.

This report outlines the findings of two separate phases of research exploring double bunking in New Zealand prisons.  Of particular interest in the first phase was the perceptions of double bunking held by prisoners who had been housed in this manner, and staff who had worked in double bunked units.  The objective of this research was to identify issues which should be addressed before double bunking was further extended.  The research involved a series of interviews with prison managers, staff and prisoners, in twelve prison units. 

The second phase occurred during the period over which the level of double bunking was expanded.  This examined rates of incidents (such as prisoner assaults and incidents of disorder) for the purpose of determining whether, as double bunking expanded, the rates at which such events occurred were increasing.  A core objective of this phase was to clarify the extent to which double bunking, on the scale planned, remained consistent with the goals of safe, secure and humane containment of prisoners.

Community Sentence Patterns in New Zealand

Year: 2012

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

Community Sentence Patterns in New Zealand (published April 2012) investigates the reasons why there are relatively high volumes of offenders on community sentences in New Zealand compared with other jurisdictions. It compares criminal justice statistics from New Zealand to England/Wales, Australia, Scotland and the United States.

The report provides an update on community sentence patterns in New Zealand, and how these patterns have changed over the last three decades. It sheds light on why New Zealand’s community sentences rate is higher than similar countries. The report also provides an overview of some of the difficulties in making international comparisons, which are applicable to other areas of social research.

Benchmarking Study of Home Detention Programs in Australia and New Zealand

Year: 2012

Agency: Corrections

Author: M & P Henderson & Associates Pty Ltd

The purpose of this report is to inform jurisdictions about the range and nature of home detention (HD) programs operated by Australian and New Zealand corrective services through a comparison of the key features of these programs (process benchmarking) and, based on available comparable information about program outcomes, to analyse the factors underlying variations in performance across jurisdictions (performance benchmarking). The scope of the comparison is limited to front-end and back-end programs, excluding home detention for unsentenced offenders.

Confrontational Crime in New Zealand: Findings from the 2009 New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey

Year: 2011

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

This paper has been superseded by the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey(NZCASS) 2014.

Multiple Victimisation in New Zealand: Findings from the 2009 New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey

Year: 2011

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

This paper has been superseded by the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) 2014.

Youth Court Research: Experiences and views of young people, their families and professionals

Year: 2011

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

This report presents the findings from the Youth Court research project. The research was an exploratory project aimed at providing insights into the experiences and views of young people going through the court, their families/whanau, and the experiences of Youth Court professionals. The research was conducted in the Waitakere, New Plymouth, Christchurch and Porirua Youth Courts. Including young people and families in the research allowed their experiences to be heard and added valuable firsthand insights into the variety of court users

Victim Satisfaction with Restorative Justice: A Summary of Findings

Year: 2011

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

This paper presents results from the Restorative Justice Victim Satisfaction Survey, in which 154 victims who had attended a restorative justice conference were interviewed by telephone. The survey measured the experience of, and satisfaction with, Ministry of Justice-funded restorative justice processes.

Family Court Review: Parenting Through Separation Participant Feedback

Year: 2011

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Ministry of Justice

Parenting Through Separation is a free voluntary information programme for parents and aims to help separating parents help their children. The Ministry of Justice funds providers across the country to deliver the programme. It usually takes place over two sessions of about two hours each and is delivered to groups of up to 16 parents. This paper presents data extracted from the closed questions on the registration and evaluation forms of participants.