Justice Sector Datalab

Research and evaluation collection

266 Results

Evaluation of 'Parenting Through Separation' Programme

Year: 2009

Agency: Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families

Author: Jeremy Robertson and Jan Prior

The Ministry of Justice has funded the development and provision of the Parenting Through Separation (PTS) programme for separating parents in New Zealand. This report presents an evaluation of the PTS programme. Information was obtained from multiple informants, including programme providers and programme participants. This information was used to evaluate the programme in terms of its goals and its impact on parents.

Parenting Hearings Programme Pilot: Technical Report

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Trish Knaggs and Anne Harland

Methodolgy report of Parenting Hearings Programme (PHP) pilot evaluation.

 

 

Parenting Hearings Programme Pilot: Evaluation report

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Trish Knaggs and Anne Harland

The Parenting Hearings Programme (PHP) pilot is a new process initiated by the Principal Family Court Judge, Judge P Boshier. It commenced in six courts on 1 November 2006. The pilot is intended to provide an early response to urgent applications under the Care of Children Act 2004, and to cases not resolved through counselling or mediation. The evaluation included exploratory work at two PHP courts, followed by key informant interviews, a postal survey of parents, an Internet survey of Family Court lawyers involved in PHP, and discussions with a small number of key PHP stakeholders. Statistical analysis of Case Management System (CMS) data was also undertaken.

Analysis of the Māori experience: Findings from the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2006

Year: 2009

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Chris Cunningham, Sue Triggs and Sally Faisandier

This paper has been superseded by the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) 2014.

Community Policing evaluations

Year: 2009

Agency: NZ Police

Author: NZ Police

A refreshed national community policing initiative is being implemented by New Zealand Police in accordance with the NZ Police strategic goal of community reassurance. Over the years 2006/7 to 2008/9 250 new positions were allocated to community policing. NZ Police and Government needed to be informed of the effectiveness of this significant new investment and existing Community Policing initiatives were evaluated.

The purpose of the evaluations were to: provide an overview of the operation of the new initiatives; assess progress towards achieving the desired outcomes; outline the strengths and challenges of the initiatives; and determine ways the additional community policing positions contribute to the goals of the national community policing strategy.

What works now

Year: 2009

Agency: Corrections

Author: Corrections

A substantial body of research evidence, known as the “What Works” literature, was influential in the design of the Department’s current sentence management framework.  This literature revolved around a number of key principles of correctional rehabilitation which, if adhered to in the design and delivery of services, would reliably lead to reduced rates of re-offending.  The principles of effective correctional rehabilitation can be divided into three major domains, namely risk, targets and “responsivity”.

The Manukau Family Violence Court: An Evaluation of the Family Violence Court Process

Year: 2008

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Trish Knaggs, Felicity Leahy, Nataliya Soboleva

This report describes the operation of the Manukau Family Violence Court, draws on qualitative and quantitative information to present findings and considers the extent to which this court is meeting its objectives. The report concludes by discussing the policy and practice implications of these findings, and makes suggestions for improving court processes. These evaluation findings along with those from the Waitakere  Family Violence Court will contribute to the ongoing refinement of court processes at existing and new  Family Violence Courts.

The Waitakere and Manukau Family Violence Courts: An evaluation summary

Year: 2008

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Trish Knaggs, Felicity Leahy, Nataliya Soboleva, Su-Wuen Ong

This document summarises major findings from recently completed reports on the Manukau and Waitakere Family Violence Courts. Information for these reports was collected using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The findings, although subject to limitations, will help improve processes at both Family Violence Courts, and inform the development and implementation of additional Family Violence Courts.

Victims' Experiences and Needs: New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey 2006

Year: 2008

Agency: Ministry of Justice

Author: Pat Mayhew and James Reilly

This paper has been superseded by the New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey (NZCASS) 2014.

Responding Together: An Integrated Report Evaluating the Aims of the Waitakere Family Violence Court Protocols

Year: 2008

Agency: Massey University for the Ministry of Justice

Author: Mandy Morgan, Leigh Coombes, Erika Te Hiwi and Sarah McGray

This report draws together the findings from An Evaluation of the Waitakere Family Violence Court protocols: Preliminary report (Morgan, Coombes, & McGray, 2007), Study One, and Accounting for safety: A sample of women victims’ experiences of safety through the Waitakere Family Violence Court (Morgan, Coombes, Te Hiwi & McGray, 2007), Study Two. The integration of these studies was commissioned by the Ministry of Justice and is the fourth product within an ongoing collaborative programme of evaluation being conducted by the researchers and stakeholders in the Waitakere Family Violence Court (WFVC). The findings of Study One and Study Two assessed the extent to which the protocols that regulate the court’s processes are effective in achieving the court’s aims. This report has four objectives specified by the Ministry of Justice:

• Describe the operation of the Waitakere Family Violence Court

• Discuss the role of non-government organisations in the WFVC, assess the level of support they provide, and at what cost.

• Describe programmes provided by non-government organisations to both victims and offenders who have been involved with the WFVC.

• Describe the perceptions of some victims who have been involved with the WFVC, including degree to which they feel safer as a result of this involvement. 

The first three objectives are primarily met through the findings of Study One, and the fourth objective is primarily met by the findings of Study Two. In integrating the studies, this report also brings together findings that are relevant to meeting the objectives of this report, and therefore excludes some findings included in the original studies.